Schwarzman-cover.jpg
       
     
katsuyama-cover.jpg
       
     
Norma
       
     
Cavelleria Rusticana
       
     
Pagliacci
       
     
ohp zac 3e.jpg
       
     
   Don Giovani  
 Oil and mixed media on canvas 
 122 x 152cm (48.8'' x 60.8'') 
  
       
     
ohp zac 2e.jpg
       
     
    
  carmen  
 Oil and mixed media on canvas 
 122 x 152cm (48.8'' x 60.8'') 
  
       
     
Adiana Lecouvreur
       
     
   Pellease et Mellesande  
 122 x 152cm. (48.8'' x 60.8'') 
 Oil and mixed media on canvas 
   
   Pelléas et Mélisande   ( Pelléas and Mélisande ) is an  opera  in five acts with music by  Claude Debussy . The French  libretto  was adapted from  Maurice Maeterlinck 's  Symbolist  play   Pelléas et Mélisande  . It premiered at the  Opéra-Comique  in  Paris  on 30 April 1902 with  Jean Périer  as Pelléas and  Mary Garden  as Mélisande in a performance conducted by  André Messager , who was instrumental in getting the Opéra-Comique to stage the work. The only opera Debussy ever completed, it is considered a landmark in 20th-century music. 
 The plot concerns a  love triangle . Prince Golaud finds a mysterious young woman, Mélisande, lost in a forest. He marries her and brings her back to the castle of his grandfather, King Arkel of Allemonde. Here Mélisande becomes increasingly attached to Golaud’s younger half-brother Pelléas, arousing Golaud’s jealousy. Golaud goes to excessive lengths to find out the truth about Pelléas and Mélisande’s relationship, even forcing his own child, Yniold, to spy on the couple. Pelléas decides to leave the castle but arranges to meet Mélisande one last time and the two finally confess their love for one another. Golaud, who has been eavesdropping, rushes out and kills Pelléas. Mélisande dies shortly after, having given birth to a daughter, with Golaud still begging her to tell him “the truth”.
       
     
ohp zac 4e.jpg
       
     
ohp zac 6e.jpg
       
     
Zanneto
       
     
     
  Francesca da Rimini  
 Oil and mixed media on canvas 
 122 x 152cm (48.8'' x 60.8'') 
 The story takes place in  Ravenna  and  Rimini . 
 Francesca, daughter of  Guido I da Polenta , for state reasons, is to be married to Giovanni, known as Gianciotto, the malformed son of Malatesta de Verrucchio. But as Francesca would certainly refuse to marry the lame and deformed Gianciotto, she is introduced in the first act, by means of a well-laid plot, to his handsome younger brother, Paolo, known as il Bello. Under the impression that Paolo is her destined bridegroom, Francesca falls deeply in love with him at first sight; he also falls passionately in love with her, although they do not exchange a single word. 
 The next act shows a fight in progress between the  Guelphs and Ghibellines , and on the platform of a tower of the Malatesti, Francesca, now married to Gianciotto, meets Paolo and gently reproaches him for the fraud practised on her. He protests his innocence of the plot and reveals his intense passion for her. Gianciotto brings the news of Paolo's election as Captain of the People and Commune of Florence. Paolo departs for Florence. 
 In the third act Francesca, in her luxurious apartment, is reading the story of Lancelot and Guinevere to her women. They then dance and sing in celebration of the advent of Spring, until, on a whispered word from her slave, Francesca dismisses them. Paolo, sick with longing for her, has returned from Florence. He enters; they continue reading the story of Guinevere together, until, no longer in control of their feelings, they let their lips meet in a long kiss. 
 In the fourth act Malatestino, Gianciotto's youngest brother, who himself lusts for Francesca, has discovered her secret meetings with Paolo. After Francesca refuses to give in to his sexual advances, Malatestino betrays Francesca and Paolo to Gianciotto, who determines to find out the truth for himself. Accordingly, Gianciotto lies in wait outside Francesca's door, and surprising her and Paolo together at early dawn, he slays them both.
       
     
   Orpheus in the underworld  
 oil and mixed media on canvas 
 152 x 109cm (60.8'' x 43.6'') 
  
       
     
   Forza del Destino  
 Oil and mixed media on canvas 
 122 x 152cm (48.8'' x 60.8'') 
   La forza del destino   ( The Force of Destiny ) is an Italian  opera  by  Giuseppe Verdi . The  libretto  was written by  Francesco Maria Piave  based on a Spanish drama,  Don Álvaro o la fuerza del sino  (1835), by  Ángel de Saavedra, Duke of Rivas , with a scene adapted from  Friedrich Schiller 's Wallensteins Lager . It was first performed in the  Bolshoi Kamenny Theatre  of  St. Petersburg ,  Russia , on 22 November  [ O.S.  10 November]  1862. 
  La forza del destino  is still frequently performed, and there have been a number of complete recordings. In addition, the  overture  (to the revised version of the opera) is part of the standard  repertoire  for  symphony orchestras , often played as the opening piece at concerts. 
  
       
     
   Fidelio  
 Oil and mixed media on canvas 
 122 x 152cm (48.8'' x 60.8'') 
  
       
     
The Abduction of Persephone
       
     
     
  Kata  
 oil and collage on canvas 
 170 x 110cm (68'' x 44'')
       
     
   Priestess  
 oil and mixed media on canvas 
 152 x 109cm (60.8'' x 43.6'') 
  
       
     
    
  La Boheme  
 oil and collage on canvas 
 170 x 110cm (68'' x 44'') 
  SOLD
       
     
    
  Robert devereux  
 oil and collage on canvas 
 170 x 110cm (68'' x 44'') 
  SOLD
       
     
   Hansel und gretel  
 oil and collage on canvas 
 170 x 110cm (68'' x 44'')
       
     
Lucia di Lammermoor (Donizetti)
       
     
Eugene Onegin (Tchaikovsky)
       
     
Gianni Schicchi
       
     
Turn of the screw
       
     
Falstaff (Verdi)
       
     
Li barbiere di Siviglia
       
     
La fanciulla del west
       
     
Cosi fan tutte (Mozart)
       
     
Schwarzman-cover.jpg
       
     
katsuyama-cover.jpg
       
     
Norma
       
     
Norma

Opera Holland park commission 2014

Oil on Panel 

Contact

Cavelleria Rusticana
       
     
Cavelleria Rusticana
Cavelleria Rusticana 2013 
Opera Holland Park 2013 commssion

In this depiction, Alfio is portrayed brandishing a Stiletto knife whilst clasping an empty chalice of wine. "At home the wine cup passes too freely." He stands with his back to a heavily ornate Sicilian church door. The depicted saints rally as if conscious of his impending tragedy. "Unbacio, Mamma! un alto bacio! - Addio (one kiss, one kiss, my Mother. And yet another farewell).
£12950
Preselected for Royal Society of Portrait Painters 2013 open exhibition

 

Pagliacci
       
     
Pagliacci

Paliacci 2013

Opera Holland Park 2013 commssion

Below a synopsis published in Scenario magazine 2013.

'I wanted to paint Canio not as Pagliaccio but as Canio himself, as the prologue states. (Si può?... Si può?... Signore! Signori! ... Un nido di memorie.) 'the actors have feelings too, and that the show is about real humans'. Therefore Canio has no makeup and is shown amidst a backdrop of blood red. For he has exacted his crime of passion. On the block of red dances four diamonds, a symbol often used to represent the fool. As his clothes were made of patches. these diamonds represent the four characters of the play. Each diamond has a dimension divisible by four. There is a similar rhythm throughout the painting. '

 

Preselected for Royal Society of Portrait Painters 2013 open exhibition 

Contact

ohp zac 3e.jpg
       
     
ohp zac 3e.jpg
   Don Giovani  
 Oil and mixed media on canvas 
 122 x 152cm (48.8'' x 60.8'') 
  
       
     

Don Giovani

Oil and mixed media on canvas

122 x 152cm (48.8'' x 60.8'')

 

ohp zac 2e.jpg
       
     
ohp zac 2e.jpg
L'elisir d'amore 
Opera Holland Park 2013 commssion

Memorina sits gazing at us here with a glint of mischievousness and frivolity while she daintily holds a flower offered out of courtship from Belcove.  The backdrop consists of potion bottles each labeled with an illustration from the love story of Tristian and Isolde or a Bordeaux label from that period.  Many are consumed in order to gain the love of this fair Memorina.

 

    
  carmen  
 Oil and mixed media on canvas 
 122 x 152cm (48.8'' x 60.8'') 
  
       
     

carmen

Oil and mixed media on canvas

122 x 152cm (48.8'' x 60.8'')

 

Adiana Lecouvreur
       
     
Adiana Lecouvreur

Opera Holland Park commission 2014

Oil On Panel

125 by 160cm. (50' x 64')

Contact

 

   Pellease et Mellesande  
 122 x 152cm. (48.8'' x 60.8'') 
 Oil and mixed media on canvas 
   
   Pelléas et Mélisande   ( Pelléas and Mélisande ) is an  opera  in five acts with music by  Claude Debussy . The French  libretto  was adapted from  Maurice Maeterlinck 's  Symbolist  play   Pelléas et Mélisande  . It premiered at the  Opéra-Comique  in  Paris  on 30 April 1902 with  Jean Périer  as Pelléas and  Mary Garden  as Mélisande in a performance conducted by  André Messager , who was instrumental in getting the Opéra-Comique to stage the work. The only opera Debussy ever completed, it is considered a landmark in 20th-century music. 
 The plot concerns a  love triangle . Prince Golaud finds a mysterious young woman, Mélisande, lost in a forest. He marries her and brings her back to the castle of his grandfather, King Arkel of Allemonde. Here Mélisande becomes increasingly attached to Golaud’s younger half-brother Pelléas, arousing Golaud’s jealousy. Golaud goes to excessive lengths to find out the truth about Pelléas and Mélisande’s relationship, even forcing his own child, Yniold, to spy on the couple. Pelléas decides to leave the castle but arranges to meet Mélisande one last time and the two finally confess their love for one another. Golaud, who has been eavesdropping, rushes out and kills Pelléas. Mélisande dies shortly after, having given birth to a daughter, with Golaud still begging her to tell him “the truth”.
       
     

Pellease et Mellesande

122 x 152cm. (48.8'' x 60.8'')

Oil and mixed media on canvas

 

Pelléas et Mélisande (Pelléas and Mélisande) is an opera in five acts with music by Claude Debussy. The French libretto was adapted from Maurice Maeterlinck's Symbolist play Pelléas et Mélisande. It premiered at the Opéra-Comique in Paris on 30 April 1902 with Jean Périer as Pelléas and Mary Garden as Mélisande in a performance conducted by André Messager, who was instrumental in getting the Opéra-Comique to stage the work. The only opera Debussy ever completed, it is considered a landmark in 20th-century music.

The plot concerns a love triangle. Prince Golaud finds a mysterious young woman, Mélisande, lost in a forest. He marries her and brings her back to the castle of his grandfather, King Arkel of Allemonde. Here Mélisande becomes increasingly attached to Golaud’s younger half-brother Pelléas, arousing Golaud’s jealousy. Golaud goes to excessive lengths to find out the truth about Pelléas and Mélisande’s relationship, even forcing his own child, Yniold, to spy on the couple. Pelléas decides to leave the castle but arranges to meet Mélisande one last time and the two finally confess their love for one another. Golaud, who has been eavesdropping, rushes out and kills Pelléas. Mélisande dies shortly after, having given birth to a daughter, with Golaud still begging her to tell him “the truth”.

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ohp zac 4e.jpg
Madame Butterly 2013
Opera Holland Park 2013 commssion

Ciocio-san grips her father's Hara-Kiri knife while in the other a mirror, her son wrapped in the stars and strips as opposed to holding the flag, stands behind her, left for Pinkerton by Ciocio-san.  There are seven stripes here to mirror the seven Hinomaru (circle of the sun) which contains seven Buddha symbolising the Ciocio-san's ancestors of her religion, rejected for Pinkerton's Christian God represented here in the crucifixion of Jesus.

 

 

ohp zac 6e.jpg
       
     
ohp zac 6e.jpg

I gioielle della 2013
Opera Holland Park 2013 commssion

Maliella, 'girl born of sin', framed by 'little hooded rosebud" in a homage to Gustav Klimts "Giuditta", 1901. She is shown in the similar throws of ecstasy beguiled by delirious confusion after she is bedecked with sparkling jewels given to her by Gennaro, the brother to whom she yields.

 

Zanneto
       
     
Zanneto

In this depiction due to the double bill production I thought it interesting to create a diptych of Zanetto and Gianni Schicchi. In which I have placed the characters Silvia and Laureta as one in the same, with obvious emphasis on Lauretta who on her knees grasps at her father. The Schicchi painting focuses on ‘O mio babbino caro' scene in which Lauretta pleads to her father. Schicchi holding a rolled parchment (the will), is seated on a chair only markered in to add a sense of fickleness and deception of Schicchis trickery. Schicchi, a sometimes parodied harlequin figure as seen in Mehcovitz’s poster for a 1918 production, usually dressed in red. Which seems apt, as Schicchi briefly appears in Dantes 8th level of hell. I’ve further added to the Harlequin parrody by borrowing elements of composition and colour from Picasso’s ‘The Harlequin's Family', 1905. The harlequin ‘ the devils messenger’ serves as a potent addition to schicchis overall personality worthy of the hatred bestowed upon him by the family. We then lead into the painting of Zanetto, who is sat by him self gazing away from the other two, Zanneto clutches tentatively to his guitar not really aware and dreaming of things that may or may not come to pass. Minstrel becomes Busker in my interpretation.

£12950

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zanetto

     
  Francesca da Rimini  
 Oil and mixed media on canvas 
 122 x 152cm (48.8'' x 60.8'') 
 The story takes place in  Ravenna  and  Rimini . 
 Francesca, daughter of  Guido I da Polenta , for state reasons, is to be married to Giovanni, known as Gianciotto, the malformed son of Malatesta de Verrucchio. But as Francesca would certainly refuse to marry the lame and deformed Gianciotto, she is introduced in the first act, by means of a well-laid plot, to his handsome younger brother, Paolo, known as il Bello. Under the impression that Paolo is her destined bridegroom, Francesca falls deeply in love with him at first sight; he also falls passionately in love with her, although they do not exchange a single word. 
 The next act shows a fight in progress between the  Guelphs and Ghibellines , and on the platform of a tower of the Malatesti, Francesca, now married to Gianciotto, meets Paolo and gently reproaches him for the fraud practised on her. He protests his innocence of the plot and reveals his intense passion for her. Gianciotto brings the news of Paolo's election as Captain of the People and Commune of Florence. Paolo departs for Florence. 
 In the third act Francesca, in her luxurious apartment, is reading the story of Lancelot and Guinevere to her women. They then dance and sing in celebration of the advent of Spring, until, on a whispered word from her slave, Francesca dismisses them. Paolo, sick with longing for her, has returned from Florence. He enters; they continue reading the story of Guinevere together, until, no longer in control of their feelings, they let their lips meet in a long kiss. 
 In the fourth act Malatestino, Gianciotto's youngest brother, who himself lusts for Francesca, has discovered her secret meetings with Paolo. After Francesca refuses to give in to his sexual advances, Malatestino betrays Francesca and Paolo to Gianciotto, who determines to find out the truth for himself. Accordingly, Gianciotto lies in wait outside Francesca's door, and surprising her and Paolo together at early dawn, he slays them both.
       
     

Francesca da Rimini

Oil and mixed media on canvas

122 x 152cm (48.8'' x 60.8'')

The story takes place in Ravenna and Rimini.

Francesca, daughter of Guido I da Polenta, for state reasons, is to be married to Giovanni, known as Gianciotto, the malformed son of Malatesta de Verrucchio. But as Francesca would certainly refuse to marry the lame and deformed Gianciotto, she is introduced in the first act, by means of a well-laid plot, to his handsome younger brother, Paolo, known as il Bello. Under the impression that Paolo is her destined bridegroom, Francesca falls deeply in love with him at first sight; he also falls passionately in love with her, although they do not exchange a single word.

The next act shows a fight in progress between the Guelphs and Ghibellines, and on the platform of a tower of the Malatesti, Francesca, now married to Gianciotto, meets Paolo and gently reproaches him for the fraud practised on her. He protests his innocence of the plot and reveals his intense passion for her. Gianciotto brings the news of Paolo's election as Captain of the People and Commune of Florence. Paolo departs for Florence.

In the third act Francesca, in her luxurious apartment, is reading the story of Lancelot and Guinevere to her women. They then dance and sing in celebration of the advent of Spring, until, on a whispered word from her slave, Francesca dismisses them. Paolo, sick with longing for her, has returned from Florence. He enters; they continue reading the story of Guinevere together, until, no longer in control of their feelings, they let their lips meet in a long kiss.

In the fourth act Malatestino, Gianciotto's youngest brother, who himself lusts for Francesca, has discovered her secret meetings with Paolo. After Francesca refuses to give in to his sexual advances, Malatestino betrays Francesca and Paolo to Gianciotto, who determines to find out the truth for himself. Accordingly, Gianciotto lies in wait outside Francesca's door, and surprising her and Paolo together at early dawn, he slays them both.

   Orpheus in the underworld  
 oil and mixed media on canvas 
 152 x 109cm (60.8'' x 43.6'') 
  
       
     

Orpheus in the underworld

oil and mixed media on canvas

152 x 109cm (60.8'' x 43.6'')

 

   Forza del Destino  
 Oil and mixed media on canvas 
 122 x 152cm (48.8'' x 60.8'') 
   La forza del destino   ( The Force of Destiny ) is an Italian  opera  by  Giuseppe Verdi . The  libretto  was written by  Francesco Maria Piave  based on a Spanish drama,  Don Álvaro o la fuerza del sino  (1835), by  Ángel de Saavedra, Duke of Rivas , with a scene adapted from  Friedrich Schiller 's Wallensteins Lager . It was first performed in the  Bolshoi Kamenny Theatre  of  St. Petersburg ,  Russia , on 22 November  [ O.S.  10 November]  1862. 
  La forza del destino  is still frequently performed, and there have been a number of complete recordings. In addition, the  overture  (to the revised version of the opera) is part of the standard  repertoire  for  symphony orchestras , often played as the opening piece at concerts. 
  
       
     

Forza del Destino

Oil and mixed media on canvas

122 x 152cm (48.8'' x 60.8'')

La forza del destino (The Force of Destiny) is an Italian opera by Giuseppe Verdi. The libretto was written by Francesco Maria Piave based on a Spanish drama, Don Álvaro o la fuerza del sino (1835), by Ángel de Saavedra, Duke of Rivas, with a scene adapted from Friedrich Schiller'sWallensteins Lager. It was first performed in the Bolshoi Kamenny Theatre of St. PetersburgRussia, on 22 November [O.S. 10 November] 1862.

La forza del destino is still frequently performed, and there have been a number of complete recordings. In addition, the overture (to the revised version of the opera) is part of the standard repertoire for symphony orchestras, often played as the opening piece at concerts.

 

   Fidelio  
 Oil and mixed media on canvas 
 122 x 152cm (48.8'' x 60.8'') 
  
       
     

Fidelio

Oil and mixed media on canvas

122 x 152cm (48.8'' x 60.8'')

 

The Abduction of Persephone
       
     
The Abduction of Persephone

The abduction of Persephone

Oil and mixed media on canvas

 

     
  Kata  
 oil and collage on canvas 
 170 x 110cm (68'' x 44'')
       
     

Kata

oil and collage on canvas

170 x 110cm (68'' x 44'')

   Priestess  
 oil and mixed media on canvas 
 152 x 109cm (60.8'' x 43.6'') 
  
       
     

Priestess

oil and mixed media on canvas

152 x 109cm (60.8'' x 43.6'')

 

    
  La Boheme  
 oil and collage on canvas 
 170 x 110cm (68'' x 44'') 
  SOLD
       
     

La Boheme

oil and collage on canvas

170 x 110cm (68'' x 44'')

SOLD

    
  Robert devereux  
 oil and collage on canvas 
 170 x 110cm (68'' x 44'') 
  SOLD
       
     

Robert devereux

oil and collage on canvas

170 x 110cm (68'' x 44'')

SOLD

   Hansel und gretel  
 oil and collage on canvas 
 170 x 110cm (68'' x 44'')
       
     

Hansel und gretel

oil and collage on canvas

170 x 110cm (68'' x 44'')

Lucia di Lammermoor (Donizetti)
       
     
Lucia di Lammermoor (Donizetti)

Lucia di Lammermoor (Donizetti)

Concentrating on the 'mad scene' with Luicia grasping the knife holding an intense stare, slightly devoid of reality while she adjusts to the brevity of what has passed. I’ve tried for a depiction of the complexity that this scene entails. The background is composed of deep hues incorporating a Scottish tartan and thistle, with splashes of blood. The thistle with its sharpness mirrors the knife clutched by Lucia. The overall composition carries elements of imbalance to create an oddity, adding more tension to the central figure. The piece is powerful yet delicate, uncomfortable yet beautiful. 

Eugene Onegin (Tchaikovsky)
       
     
Eugene Onegin (Tchaikovsky)

Eugene Onegin (Tchaikovsky)

£12950

Eugene Onegin carries a dandy pose looking confident and self assured.The background is made up of Russian cyrillic letters from a torn paper collage of the original Pushkin text. The actual physicality of tearing the text serves as a representation for the rejection of its content or a rejection of the love offered. The background is delicate with off whites of the torn letter and in stark contrast of the central figure giving a sense of overall dominance of Onegin. Through this, two opposite worlds are expressed. One of the delicate fragility involved in the matters of the heart and the other, the cold forlorn figure of Onegin. Resigned to a life bereft of love.

http://www.metoperafamily.org/metopera/history/stories/synopsis.aspx?id=250

Gianni Schicchi
       
     
Turn of the screw
       
     
Turn of the screw

Opera Holland Park commission 2014

Oil on panel

125 by 160cm. (50' x 64')

Contact

Falstaff (Verdi)
       
     
Falstaff (Verdi)

Falstaff (Verdi)

£12950

Falstaff is the central figure centering around act iii. I’ve used dark natural colours to reiterate the pagan wood nymph element that’s in act iii. Falstaff is set against Hermes antlers under which I’ve created something that resembles an oak tree with a slightly abstracted backdrop of leaves, with what appears as moonlight coming through. Falstaff is seated precariously over a laundry basket. Head rested in hand, while the other hand reaches as if asking for a tipple, with a little glint of mischief. As in all my paintings the sitter bares some element that closely resembles the character portrayed, more so with Falstaff. The sitter was especially proud of his current sobriety. Therefore casting the character without the usual representational tankard seemed apt. The drink is as important when it is not there as it is when present.

http://www.metoperafamily.org/metopera/history/stories/synopsis.aspx?id=123

Li barbiere di Siviglia
       
     
Li barbiere di Siviglia

Opera Holland Park commission 2014

Oil on Panel 

125 by 160cm. (50' x 64')

Contact

La fanciulla del west
       
     
La fanciulla del west

Opera Holland Park 2014 commission

Oil an collage on panel

125 by 160cm. (50' x 64')

Contact

Cosi fan tutte (Mozart)
       
     
Cosi fan tutte (Mozart)

Cosi fan tutte (Mozart)

£12950

The two sisters are represented in this painting, with a slightly unapologetic post feminist attitude. The image is mildly overt with one of the subjects directly engaging the viewer, challenging any voyeuristic intention. The backdrop consists of an Orchid (flower of seduction). as the opera seems to purvey a sense of seduction and deceit albeit in a comical way. Added is the 100 text to represent the hundred sequins waged. The overall composition becomes light and frivolous while showing an inherent confidence of the two sisters. ‘Women do it too’.

http://www.metoperafamily.org/metopera/history/stories/synopsis.aspx?id=390